Rotary Club of Cedar Park

Cedar Park, Texas

 

Club Executives & Directors

President
Treasurer
Secretary
Past President
Membership
Public Relations
Service Projects
Club Administration
President Elect
The Rotary Foundation
 

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Welcome to The Rotary Club of Cedar Park Website!

Welcome to our Club!

Cedar Park

Service Above Self

We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 AM
Cedar Park Regional Medical Center
1401 Medical Parkway
Classrooms 1 & 2
Cedar Park, TX  78613
United States
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District Site
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Venue Map
 

News & Announcements

Visiting The Austin Spurs

This week Tim Pryor spoke to us about the Austin Spurs.  Tim wears many hats within the Spurs organization, including sales and marketing.
The Austin Spurs were established in Columbus, Georgia as The Columbus Riverdragons.
 
The franchise in 2005 was sold to Southwest Basketball, LLC, and were relocated to the city of Austin, Texas. Following the relocation, the franchise changed their name and logo becoming the Austin Toros, which was unveiled on August 10, 2005. The Toros name was the only NBA-associated team and first D-League team to possess a nickname of Spanish origin. The Toros began play during the 2005-2006 season.
 
The team now plays their home games at Cedar Park Center. They have been very successful, making the postseason 7 out of their 12 seasons in the NBA Development League.
 
On June 28, 2007, the Toros were acquired by the San Antonio Spurs, becoming the second D-League team ever to be owned by an NBA team, after the Los Angeles D-Fenders were purchased by the Los Angeles Lakers in 2006.
 
On August 9, 2010, the Toros announced they would move to the Cedar Park Center from the Austin Convention Center and would play in their new facility starting in the 2010–11 season.
 
On April 28, 2012, the Toros defeated the Los Angeles D-Fenders in Game 3 of the NBA D-League Finals to capture their first championship in franchise history.
On October 15, 2014, the team announced that they will be changing their name to the Austin Spurs, in reference to their parent team.  After the San Antonio Spurs purchased the franchise, the team colors and logo were changed to reflect the silver and black motif used by the Spurs.
 
To learn more, or to order tickets, visit http://austin.dleague.nba.com/
 
 

 
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Rotary's Areas of Focus

For more than 100 years, Rotarians have joined together from all continents, cultures, and industries to take action in our communities and around the world.  With a commitment to achieving lasting change, Rotarians work together to empower youth, enhance health, promote peace, and most importantly, advance the community.  While Rotarians can serve in countless ways, Rotary has focused it efforts in six areas, which reflect some of the most critical and widespread humanitarian needs:

  • Peace and conflict prevention/resolution
  • Disease prevention and treatment
  • Water and sanitation
  • Maternal and child health
  • Basic education and literacy
  • Economic and community development
To learn more about Rotary and its work in these six area, browse this website and/or visit the Rotary International website.
 

 
 

Why Rotary?


Members of a Rotary Club are frequently asked "What is Rotary and why should I join?"  Here is a video answer to these questions.

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Bringing education to rural Mexican area, one school at a time
When Mariana Day moved in 1989 to the small beach town of Chacala, in Nayarit, Mexico, she noticed that the surrounding rural areas struggled to maintain schools. And most children weren’t able to go beyond an eighth-grade education. Day, who is a member of the Rotary Club of Bahía de Jaltemba-La Peñita, in Nayarit, had started a local scholarship program before she joined Rotary. Called Changing Lives, the program provided students with high school tuition, uniforms, school supplies, and transportation. In addition, Rotary clubs from the United States and Mexico have been investing in the...
Member spotlight: Peak performer scales Kilimanjaro
From the September 2015 issue of The Rotarian When Carole Kimutai was growing up in Nairobi, family members were always coming for long stays – a grandparent one month, a cousin the next. "Anyone who needed school fees would come to Nairobi, and my parents would assist," she says. "Or if my grandmother was sick, she would come to live with us until she was better. It was natural to help others." Years later, Kimutai was invited to a meeting of the Rotary Club of Nairobi-East, where she instantly felt at home. "I grew up seeing my parents help relatives, and now I am seeing people help quote-...
Convention: Hear the music
From the September 2015 issue of The Rotarian Chances are, you’ve heard of Psy and his signature song, “Gangnam Style.” He’s the Korean pop star with dark sunglasses and a distinctive galloping horse dance who was everywhere a few years ago, including on a This Close ad for End Polio Now. But what you might not know is that Psy is merely the tip of the colossal iceberg known as K-pop, short for Korean pop. If you plan to attend the 2016 Rotary International Convention in Seoul from 28 May to 1 June, you won’t have to search for K-pop – you’ll hear it in the streets, in cafes, in taxis, and on...
Member interview: Jay Cook helps young people through Rotary Youth Exchange
From the September 2015 issue of The Rotarian A Rotarian for nearly three decades, Jay Cook has helped hundreds of young people broaden their horizons through Rotary Youth Exchange. Recently, while working for the nonprofit Water Missions International, he’s turned his attention to bringing safe water and sanitation solutions to developing countries and disaster-stricken areas. Cook is a member of the Rotary Club of Charleston Breakfast and the Water and Sanitation Rotarian Action Group. THE ROTARIAN: How did you become involved with Rotary Youth Exchange? COOK: My club was hosting a young...
Technology: To please in a pod(cast)
From the September 2015 issue of The Rotarian When I was a college student in Wisconsin in the 1970s, those of us who worked at the 10-watt radio station hoped our signal would reach not only the 1,500 students on the Beloit College campus and the 35,000 residents of the town of Beloit but also the people in the cars and trucks passing by on the interstate 3 miles to the east – and possibly, late at night, the 150,000 who lived in the bustling metropolis of Rockford, Ill., 20 miles to the south. Some of us hoped to get jobs in radio after we graduated, and there was even talk about starting...